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Collegiate Raised Breastplate Standing Martingale

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Collegiate Raised Breastplate Standing Martingale
584022-

Availability: In stock

$124.99

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$124.99

The Collegiate Raised Breastplate Standing Martingale is a tastefully detailed breastplate with a standing attachment, suitable for the hunter ring. Running martingales are attachments to assist in keeping the horse from getting his head too high, but by their nature are influenced by the rider’s hands. These are permitted only in the jumpers, and are not recommended for beginner use. Standing martingales are allowed in the Hunters. Standing martingales, conversely, are...

The Collegiate Raised Breastplate Standing Martingale is a tastefully detailed breastplate with a standing attachment, suitable for the hunter ring. Running martingales are attachments to assist in keeping the horse from getting his head too high, but by their nature are influenced by the rider’s hands. These are permitted only in the jumpers, and are not recommended for beginner use. Standing martingales are allowed in the Hunters. Standing martingales, conversely, are fixed to the noseband of the bridle, and are not influenced by less-than-perfect hands. Appropriate for even beginner riders to assist in ideal head carriage for the horse, the standing martingale is active when the horse gets his head too high by putting pressure on the nose and poll to encourage it downward again. The Collegiate Raised Breastplate Standing Martingale has an elegant vein of leather on the exterior of the neck strap. It has a loop of leather that goes around the girth, between the front legs of the horse, and meets at the neck strap with a central ring. The standing attachment branches from this to the noseband of the bridle. Properly adjusted, the standing attachment should be long enough to travel straight up the neck and into the throat latch of the horse when pressed upward by someone on the ground. If it is tighter than this length, it is too tight to be properly used.
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